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A beautifully told story with colorful characters out of epic tradition, a tight and complex plot, and solid pacing. -- Booklist, starred review of On the Razor's Edge

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Monday, October 7, 2013

The Great Ptolemaic Smackdown: TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. The Great Ptolemaic Smackdown

2. The Great Ptolemaic Smackdown: Down for the Count

3. The Great Ptolemaic Smackdown:
The Great Galileo-Scheiner Flame War of 1611-13


4. The Great Ptolemaic Smackdown:
The Down 'n Dirty Mud Wrassle


5. The Great Ptolemaic Smackdown: Here's Mud in Yer Eye

6. The Great Ptolemaic Smackdown: Comet Chameleon

7. The Great Ptolemaic Smackdown: Time and Tides Wait Not

8. The Great Ptolemaic Smackdown: Trial and Error

9. The Great Ptolemaic Smackdown: From Plausible to Proven   

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    1. Go ahead; but be sure to link to the original English language versions. Be aware that there are typos that have not all been corrected.
      TOF

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  2. Marvelous series, Mr. Flynn! It's helped put some matters in perspective for me in my own studies of this material.

    I'm not sure how often you get to see these comments, but I wanted to share some book recommendations on the subject of the ancient and modern quarrel on science that might of some interest to you, if you haven't read them already!

    A scholar by the name of Jacob Klein, who helped develop the aim of the math and science programs at the school at graduated from (St. John's College) wrote a very excellent book on Greek mathematical thought, with the aim of trying to understand what changed in the understanding of mathematics between the ancients and the early moderns, especially Descartes. That book ("Greek Mathematical Thought and the Origin of Algebra") was to be the first part of a inquiry into how physics became so deeply affiliated with math, an inquiry that was only minimally followed through on (in some of his essays in the collection "Lectures and Essay"). Another scholar, Richard Kennington, made some good efforts at carrying on some of that project by close study of the early moderns ("On Modern Origins: Essays in Early Modern Philosophy").

    There's a very nice introduction to Kennington's thought at First Principles:
    http://www.firstprinciplesjournal.com/print.aspx?article=1594

    But very nice work with your blog! I've been occupied reading your essays on science for the last few days, and its given me much to think about!

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